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Welcome to William Schoell's GREAT OLD MOVIES blog. Feel free to leave a comment regardless of the date the review was posted -- I read 'em all. Or if you prefer -- and especially if you have any questions directly for me -- email me at tawses67424@mypacks.net and I'll get back to you as soon as I can. Click on a label link (labels can be found at the bottom of each post) to find other movies from that year, the star, that director or genre and so on. Or enter a title, director, genre, star or supporting player in the small Blogger "search blog" box at the far left up above and click search blog. [NOTE: While this blog mostly reviews films -- and TV shows -- that are at least twenty-five years old, we do cover films up until the present day.] HAVE FUN AND THANKS FOR DROPPING BY. William.

Thursday, June 30, 2011

THE GIRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS


THE GIRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS (1957). Director: Howard W. Koch.

A young woman is found sliced and diced in an area near a hotel in Utah owned by Ed Parry, a bitter, woman-hating "cripple" (Ron Randell) and the sister, Julia, (Marie Windsor) who takes care of him. The young lady is only the first of a number of victims. The suspects are numerous and include lawyer David Hewson (Lex Barker); his girlfriend Beth (Anne Bancroft), who is Ed's physical therapist; washed-up actor Norman Grant (John Holland) and his girlfriend Harriet (Mamie Van Doren); good-lookin' Frankie Pierce (Gerald Frank); and crazy "Indian Joe" (Larry Chance), among others. John Dehner is the sheriff on the case, Richard Cutting is the doctor, and Stuart Whitman shows up briefly as a man looking for his wife. Dan Blocker, later to play "Hoss" on Bonanza, appears as an obnoxious bartender. Bancroft is, as expected, much better than the material, but Randell mostly seems to be making faces. The Girl in Black Stockings has an interesting plot and characters, but the murder scenes have no elan and the wind-up is psychologically dubious to say the least. Still, it has its moments. From those classy folk at Bel-Air studios who brought you Three Bad Sisters and Voodoo Island.

Verdict: Bancroft went on to better things. **1/2.

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